Various - apocalypse chaos


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  • Articles on Apocalypse Road in InsideGMT:
    • Apocalypse Road Development Update , by Jeff & Carla Horger
    • Racing into the Apocalypse , by Jeff & Carla Horger
    • Arenas of the Apocalypse , by Jeff Horger
    • The Beasts of the Apocalypse , by Jeff Horger
    • Surviving the Apocalypse , by Jeff Horger



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In the bleak future, after the collapse of our modern technological world, most of the structures we hold dearly today are no longer effective. The things that brought us comfort and ease have fallen into disrepair and disuse. Central governments have given way to localized strongmen. In some places the world is nothing but a vast wasteland and in other locals mankind thrives by calling back to its pre-modern lifestyle. 
Through it all men still choose to compete and challenge each other in the various arenas. Auto racing is one of these sports that will not die. But the rules no longer apply. The racing circuits are no longer about speed and guile. Now they resemble high speed demolition derbies. The most famous organized racing competition of them all, the Apocalypse Road, is run by callous thugs and monsters who encourage drivers to arm their cars and literally destroy their opponents. It is the Roman Coliseum reincarnated.

Over time, new rules and organizational structures have taken hold. Ten teams now complete across the Thunderverse in a season-long show of firepower and twisted metal. Drivers work as part of a team struggling to complete laps under machine gun and even missile fire. The tracks, falling into decades of disrepair, are a jumbled mess of jumps, joker lanes and dirt. Much like the gladiators of old, in a time of intense anguish, the chance to be a hero, even for a day, calls drivers out to risk life and limb for wealth and food. The arena beckons, will you take the wheel?

Emilio Estevez was born on May 12, 1962, in New York City. He is the eldest son of actor Martin Sheen , who at the time was just breaking into the business. His mother, Janet Sheen (née Templeton), was a former New York art student who had met Emilio's father right after he had moved to Manhattan. Martin and Janet had three other children, Charlie Sheen , Renée Estevez , and Ramon Estevez , all of whom became actors. His father is of half Spanish and half Irish descent, and his mother, whose family is from Kentucky, has English and Scottish ancestry.

He lived on Manhattan's Upper West Side until his family relocated to Malibu in 1968. Before graduating from Santa Monica High School in 1980, Estevez had already had a small role as a messenger boy in Апокалипсис сегодня (1979), that was ultimately cut from the film.

Though his father had opted to use the stage name "Sheen" over his more ethnic birth name "Estevez," Emilio chose to retain the family name, hoping to avoid riding his father's coattails. He also thought the double "E" set of initials was "pretty."

He appeared in a few TV movies, the first of which was Seventeen Going on Nowhere (1980), before making his big-screen debut opposite Matt Dillon in 1982's Tex (1982). A part in The Outsiders (1983) followed, and Estevez made his first big splash as the punk rocker Otto in the cult classic Repo Man (1984).

Originally cast as Bender (The Criminal) in the seminal John Hughes flick The Breakfast Club (1985), Estevez took the part of Andrew (The Athlete) instead after Hughes could find no one else to fill the role. Another ensemble film, St. Elmo's Fire (1985) came next. Then Estevez made his screen-writing debut with That Was Then... This Is Now (1985), a film in which he also starred.

He then starred in the Stephen King thriller Maximum Overdrive (1986), but the film was a failure. The ambitious young actor added directing to his palette with Wisdom (1987) in 1986, but the film was universally panned and struck out at the box office. Estevez quickly rebounded with hits like Stakeout (1987) and Young Guns (1988), as well as their subsequent sequels. He tried his hand at directing again with Men at Work (1990) before taking on one of his most famous roles as Coach Gordon Bombay in Могучие утята (1992). The enormously popular Disney film spawned sequels and an NHL hockey team of the same name, but Estevez was interested in making weighter films.

He agreed to make a brief appearance in Могучие утята 3 (1996) in exchange for Disney helping him finance and distribute another effort as actor-director, Война в доме (1996). Though smiled on by critics, Война в доме (1996) received a paltry distribution by Disney and thus went largely unseen. A devastated Estevez considered quitting the business but has ultimately continued to work in films, including a fourth effort as director and star, Порнушка (2000), which co-starred brother Charlie Sheen and was a selection at the Sundance Film Festival. In 2006, Бобби (2006), a film about the assassination of Senator Robert F. Kennedy that Estevez wrote, directed, and acted in, premiered at the Venice Film Festival and received a seven-minute standing ovation.

As Nur grew, he surpassed the other tribesmen in intelligence and strength. Everyone in the tribe, except for Baal, hated and feared Nur for his inhuman looks and great abilities. Nur did not understand their fear, but hardened his heart against it. Moreover, Nur believed in the principle that Baal and the tribe lived by, that only the fittest, toughest, most ruthless and pitiless, tested by hardship, would, and should, survive. At this time Egypt was ruled by Pharaoh Rama-Tut . On the day of his tribal rite of passage into manhood, the seventeen-year-old Nur killed three armed warriors of the tribe using only his bare hands and Baal explained to him that Rama-Tut was no god, as most believed, but a man, who had arrived in a sphinx . Baal brought the young Nur to a sacred cave, whose entrance became blocked by a cave-in, trapping them underground. [10] After a week of wandering without food or water, they found the remnants of Rama-Tut's time ship, within an underground Egyptian tomb. Baal told Nur that he believed him to be a conqueror, whose coming was foretold in ancient prophecies, and that Nur was destined to overthrow Rama-Tut. After Baal died from lack of nourishment, Nur, whose mutant physiology kept him alive, vowed to take vengeance on Rama-Tut and claim his destiny. Four weeks later, Nur finally made his way back to the surface and was found by Logo, the grand vizier of Rama-Tut, who gave him water and hid him as a slave. Nur was determined to kill both Rama-Tut and his warlord, Ozymandias , for their part in Baal's death. [13]


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